Netting options for backyard fruit trees

Fruit damage from birds, bats and possums is high on the list of complaints from home fruit growers. This week we look at various netting options,and how they can protect your crop from most of these problems.

The birds left us the stems!

Our new cherry trees are now producing fruit (hooray), and even though we drape netted some of them, it wasn’t completely successful – partly because we were a bit late getting some of the nets on, and partly because the type of birds that were giving us a hard time (parrots) are also particularly clever at getting under drape nets!

So, successful netting is not just about doing it in a timely fashion, it’s also about having the right system for your situation.

Another big advantage of netting your trees is providing some protection against hail, and if you’ve experienced hail before, you’ll know what we’re talking about! Hail storms are a pretty common occurrence on the farm and we lose at least some fruit to hail most seasons.

This is what hail damage looked like on our apricots last year:

Hail damage on apricots

Birds not only damage the fruit, but can help spread brown rot as well. There are lots of different ways to try to scare birds away, such as CDs hanging in the tree, fake predators and the like, but the only real solution is to net your trees – the sooner we all resign ourselves to this necessity, the happier we’ll all be!

This simple net below is made with a frame of star pickets and pipe, and is the easiest and most effective solution we’ve seen (and used).

It’s easy to put up (and take down again if you choose), and easy to peg down around the perimeter to stop persistent smaller birds getting in under the net, which can happen with drape netting (as we saw this year!). This particular set up also has wire netting around the base, which can be useful for stopping larger animals from getting into the enclosure.

Drape netting is easier if you are doing a lot more trees, and is very effective against big birds, and can also deter fruit bats, both of which descend on the tree from above and don’t like to get in under net.

Unless you are really diligent about tying off the net around the trunk, it won’t stop smaller birds like parrots, which are happy to nip under the edges of the net and help themselves. Having said that, it does keep the damage to minimum and is definitely worthwhile.

Learn practical strategies that actually work to protect your fruit from birds and other critters in Protect Fruit from Pesky Pests.

There’s slugs on my fruit trees!

Have you seen these critters on your fruit trees?

These are pear and cherry slugs, and as you can see, they eat the leaves on pear and cherry trees.

The first question to ask yourself when you see these creepy looking slugs (as with all pests and diseases on our fruit trees) is, how much damage are they really doing?

One of the advantages of keeping a close eye on your trees is that you will often notice problems as soon as they occur, and can then take simple action, like squashing the slugs between a folded leaf.


In a normal season, this particular pest will go through at least two life cycles, so the more of them you squash as soon as you see them, the more you interfere with their natural life cycle and can prevent numbers building up.

Fruit trees can actually tolerate quite a bit of damage without losing function or growth – our rule of thumb with pear and cherry slug is that if a tree has lost more than 30% of its leaves, that will be our trigger to treat them, and in all our years of growing, we’ve closely monitored every year, and never had to take action against them.

Usually what we find is that if we are patient, a predator insect will come along and do our work for us, leaving behind a dry, parasitised slug as you can see on the leaf below.

So pear and cherry slug is a great example of learning how to watch our trees and learn what’s really going on, rather than assuming that if there’s a bug, there’s a problem!

If you want to find out more about the life cycle of the pear and cherry slug, and how to treat and prevent them, check out “What’s Bugging My Fruit?“.

Prevent brown rot in apricots

It’s not uncommon, particularly after rain, to see some brown rot developing in stone fruit like apricots (you might also see it in peaches and nectarines). Notice how the brown rot often starts around a hole?

 

The holes might be caused by a tiny pest called carpophilus beetles, or in this case, earwigs! The combination of a small hole in the fruit, and a bit of rain can lead to a bit of a brown rot outbreak in your tree.

A lot of the infected fruit tends to fall to the ground, and also it’s important to remove any that you see in the tree to stop it spreading. Be sure to clean them up from the ground (goats or chooks will love to eat them) to help keep the tree disease free next year.

Controlling brown rot, like all fruit tree diseases, relies on the 8 principles of disease prevention:

  1. Love your soil
  2. Prevention is easier than cure
  3. Protect the predators
  4. Encourage variety in your garden
  5. Hygiene, hygiene, hygiene
  6. Maintain your trees
  7. Monitor your trees regularly
  8. Plan your fruit tree garden.

You’ll find more detail about the 8 principles, and details of how to manage 27 different diseases of fruit trees in What’s That Spot? Common diseases of deciduous fruit trees.