5 ways to prevent large animals damaging your fruit trees

We’ve written in other blogs how to identify which animals might be causing damage to your fruit trees, but it’s also important to think about strategies for preventing the damage!

In the case of big animals, it’s usually a case of protecting the trees using either tree guards, fences or netting enclosures.

A wire netting enclosure built to keep kangaroos away from a young fruit tree
A wire netting enclosure built to keep kangaroos away from a young fruit tree

Which of these you choose will depend on:

  • the specific pest damage you’re trying to prevent;
  • the size and age of the trees; 
  • whether you need a permanent or temporary solution; and/or
  • your capacity to buy or build something in terms of ability, time, materials and money.

So, while it’s impossible for us to give solutions for every specific situation, here’s our 5 top strategies:

  1. Deterrents: Once you’ve identified the pest, do some research into what they don’t like, and consider whether you can make the environment unpleasant for them. For example, hares are herbivores and are put off by the smell of meat, so a paste made out of animal fat and strong-smelling herbs applied to the trunks, or blood and bone scattered around the trees, may be enough to put them off.
  2. Tree guards: These can range from the simple corflute guards we use on the farm, which are fantastic because they’re durable and reusable (but have the disadvantage of not being wide enough to enclose the low branches, so they only protect the trunk) to a larger and more durable type of guard, which has the disadvantage of being more expensive and time consuming to build, and limiting easy access to the tree.
  3. Fences: Installing permanent fences to keep out animals like kangaroos, deer, hares or rabbits is an engineering challenge, and can be quite costly. However, if you’re serious about food growing it’s a fantastic investment and will pay you back many times in terms of protected future crops. Once you’ve identified the problem animals, do some investigation into the type of fencing recommended to keep them out; for example, a kangaroo exclusion netting fence needs to be at least 1.5 – 2.0 m tall, and is more effective if electrified. Deer fencing works best if a double fence is installed, and rabbits and hares will dig under a fence unless the bottom is protected with buried mesh. 
  4. Netting enclosures: These are a wonderful idea, and can serve the dual purpose of keeping out both larger animals as well as birds, fruit bats, and even possums. The one in the photo below (which we saw at Kalangadoo Organics) is made from PVC pipe. The walls are reinforced over the bottom half with chicken wire, with bird netting over the hoops at the top – a brilliant solution.
  5. Other animals: One of the natural predators of kangaroos and wallabies is the dingo, so a dog in the garden or orchard may keep them away.
A netting and fence enclosure protecting cherry trees  
at Kalangadoo Organics
A netting and fence enclosure protecting cherry trees
at Kalangadoo Organics

Building appropriate protection for your trees can easily become one of those jobs that keeps falling to the bottom of the ‘to do’ list, but in nearly every case it’s worth the time and energy. To help you bump it up the list, we’ve included some resources on building hoop net systems (such as the one above) in the short course Protect Your Crop From Birds.

The reality is, if you’re trying to grow food in an environment where lots of animals are hungry, you’ll need to build protection to make sure you get some. You may like the idea of sharing, but they don’t!

How to Prevent Leaf Curl

Leaf curl is a nasty fungal disease that affects peaches and nectarines, but it’s often confused for other things (well, other things are sometimes mis-labelled as Leaf curl).

Here’s what it looks like:

A peach tree with the classic red leaves of Leaf curl disease
A peach tree with the classic red leaves of Leaf curl disease

There are other things (both pests and diseases) that can make leaves curl in other types of fruit trees, but this particular pathogen only affects your peach and nectarine trees.

If you get a bad case, it can even affect the fruit, and really bad cases will make the fruit fail and fall off while it’s very small, before it gets a chance to grow. Notice how similar it looks to the disease on the leaves, with a rough, raised texture and the red colouring.

A nectarine infected by curly le
A nectarine infected by curly leaf

Why are we showing you what Leaf curl looks like in the middle of winter? Because if you saw any signs of this disease last year, now is the time to be treating your trees to prevent it happening again this year.

It might seem too early to be thinking about spring, but if you wait until you see the disease, it’s way too late to put out the preventive sprays.

A Goldmine nectarine bud swelling
A Goldmine nectarine bud swelling

The trigger to spray is bud-swell. Different varieties reach bud-swell at different times, which is where the skill comes in. Depending on where you live and which varieties you have, your trees may already have reached (or be past) bud-swell, but if your peach and nectarine trees still look completely dormant, that’s because they are. From now on you need to be monitoring each different variety so you can spray them at the right time.

Once you’re sure your tree has reached bud-swell, it’s time to apply a preventive copper spray – Bordeaux (which is made by diluting hydrated lime in water, and copper sulphate in water, then mixing them together), or a spray containing copper hydroxide are the best options for home use. The Better Fruit With Wise Organic Spraying short course includes a video demo of how to mix Bordeaux spray if you need more detail.

Growing Your Own Fruit Trees From Seed

One of the interesting things we do here at the farm is grow fruit trees from scratch, as well as teaching other people how to do it, which is lots of fun.

Pear seed ready to be planted to grow rootstock trees
Pear seed ready to be planted to grow rootstock tree

Some trees are grown from cuttings (e.g., plums) and some are grown from seed. We usually grow our own peach, plum, pear and quince rootstocks this way.

These days we look after the Growing Abundance juice press (which in turn is on long-term loan from the generous folk at The Little Red Apple in Harcourt), which means that Ant can use it to juice his apple and pear seconds at the end of the season.

Ant pressing apples for juice
Ant pressing apples for juice

It’s a great press, and being able to juice fruit from apples grown here on the farm (in those years when there’s a good enough apple harvest) yields enough delicious organic apple juice to share around, as well as plenty for Ant to turn into cider.

Lots of lovely apple juice
Lots of lovely apple juice

But it also means we can easily save the seed to grow organic apple rootstocks. We’ve grown all the apple trees we’ve planted here on the farm that way, a tradition which is now being continued by Carr’s Organic Fruit Tree Nursery.

Regardless of whether you’re growing trees from cutting or seed, they don’t grow “true to type”. They grow trees called rootstocks, which are used as a base to graft known fruit varieties onto.

Apple pulp full of seeds
Apple pulp full of seeds

Growing your own trees is a year-round process, with different small jobs to do at different times of year – just like all gardening really! We provide a full grafting calendar in our Grow Your Own Fruit Trees for Free course.

This is the right time of year to be:

  • Gathering scion wood from varieties you want to use for grafting in spring, and storing it correctly to keep it in good condition.
  • Gathering plum cuttings and storing them in damp sand over winter.
  • Gathering seed from apples and pears, extracting the seeds and storing them in damp sand.
  • If you’re planning a tree nursery, preparing the soil.
A box of sand for storing seed
A box of sand for storing seed

Does it sound complicated? It’s really not.

Grafting is an ancient method of preserving heritage fruit varieties that has been practised for hundreds of years, and continues to be passed from fruitgrower to fruitgrower today.

Newly emerged apple seedling
Newly emerged apple seedling

We think teaching people how to grow their own fruit trees from scratch is one of the most important skills we teach (through our grafting courses) because that’s where true fruit security starts.