Mending broken branches in fruit trees

Granny smith apple tree with broken branches

We occasionally make mistakes on our fruit trees (just so we can illustrate the theory of course!), like the apples above, or this broken branch of peaches…

Peach tree with broken branch

Branches also break for other reasons like equipment, animals, storms, disease…you name it, in fact!

Once the damage is done, the next question is “can it be repaired?”

If the break has gone all or most of the way through the wood (like the peach branch above), or has been caused by disease and the branch no longer has any healthy wood inside, then the best thing to do is make a neat pruning cut to remove the broken branch (because remember the first rule of pruning is “remove all dead and diseased wood”).

A broken limb on a fruit tree caused by a kangaroo

However if there’s still enough healthy and green wood on both sides of the split that can be brought back together, it’s worth trying a repair.

Remove the fruit (f there is any), bring the two pieces back together and make sure you can get a really good union between the two sides. Then use whatever is at hand to hold the pieces very firmly together.

Split branch on fruit tree bound with grafting tape

In this case the split was on a fairly small branch, and I had some budding tape in my pocket, so that’s what I used!

For a bigger split, for example in the trunk of a tree, you’ll need a more heavy duty solution like these cable ties.

Broken tree trunk repaired with cable ties

You may also need to support the break with some rope or hayband (baling twine) while it repairs itself.

A broken limb supported with baling twine while it heals

Leave it in place for at least a few months, and check back next spring to see whether the repair worked. If not, remove the branch, but if it did, make sure you thin that limb extra hard next year, and supply extra support as well next season to make sure it doesn’t break again.

Taking enough fruit off the branches to prevent these breaks can be very difficult, as it feels awfully destructive to throw all that fruit on the ground.

But as you can see, it’s important to protect the structure of the tree, not just this season’s fruit. If you’re still not persuaded (or not sure how to do it), invest in our short course Fruit Tree Thinning— your fruit trees will thank you!

Did you get the thinning right?

As we go about picking in the orchard during the apricot season, we see the end result of the thinning we did a couple of months ago – where it worked, and where it didn’t. Here’s a bunch of apricots that were missed in the thinning, and you can clearly see the outcome.

Out of this bunch of four, two apricots have grown normally, and two are stunted, slightly shrivelled, and not really edible – these are the ones that should have been removed when we were doing the thinning.

When they’re removed, you can see that we’re left with two reasonably sized, delicious looking apricots. But…how much bigger could they have been?

The energy that the tree has put into the two discarded fruit would have been better put into growing just two pieces of fruit in the bunch to a larger size.

This is just one reason why it’s a good idea to do thinning early, hard, and thoroughly! We’re aiming to always maximise the ratio of usable, edible fruit to core/stone that the tree produces.

We’ve also seen quite a few of these broken laterals in the orchard, which is another problem caused by leaving too much fruit on a branch that isn’t big enough to carry the weight.

Having put all our care and attention into growing and pruning the tree, it’s then our responsibility to make sure we don’t leave too much fruit on any one branch or lateral than it can carry, to protect these precious growing areas.

Sorry, tree…