Fancy a cup of compost tea?

Having our morning cuppa - of tea, not compost!
Having our morning cuppa – of tea, not compost!

We’re always banging on about soil being the foundation of your entire food growing system, and how important it is to be constantly improving it.

So one of the common questions we’re asked, is “how?”

There are lots of techniques available to help you improve soil, like adding aged chicken manure, and compost (and we’re big fans of them). However one of the most useful (though least understood) is brewing your own compost tea.

We brew it on a big scale (as you can see in the photo below), but it’s also easy to make on a home garden scale.

Our 1,000 L compost tea brewer set up for demonstration at a workshop
Our 1,000 L compost tea brewer set up for demonstration at a workshop

So, what is it? It’s probably easiest to start with what it’s NOT, which is compost extract.

Compost extract is made by putting compost in water and swishing it around or leaving it to soak. You can do a similar thing with weeds to make a weed tea or weed extract. They’re both fantastic things to do, but all they do is to put the nutrients and any microbes present into solution.

This method doesn’t increase the number of microbes in the brew, and that’s the point of compost tea.

Hugh showing off his bathtub full of rich worm castings, which will be used to make compost tea
Hugh showing off his bathtub full of rich worm castings, which will be used to make compost tea

To brew compost tea we start with a small amount of something that’s rich in microbes, e.g., good compost, worm castings, or leaf litter from under a mature gum tree are all perfect for this. Then we put the source material in water, agitate it to knock the microbes off, then add microbe food and oxygen for 24-48 hours and voila! The microbes breed like…well, like microbes (that is, REALLY fast when conditions are right).

Components for the compost tea brewer
Components for the compost tea brewer

This turns a small amount of healthy microbes (bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and protozoa) into a huge number in a very short time.

On the farm we always check the brew to make sure we’ve actually got the right kind of microbes, but that’s not necessary in a home-brew situation, as long as you follow the guidelines.

Hugh checking the compost tea to make sure it's full of microbes (and not just brown water!)
Hugh checking the compost tea to make sure it’s full of microbes (and not just brown water!)

Then we just put the tea on the soil under our fruit trees, and let the microbes go to work. 

If you want to know more about this simple and very effective method of quickly building healthy soil, we’ve designed a short course just for you! It’s called The Art of Compost Tea, it includes plans for making a home-sized brewer, and you can download it here.

3 Ways to Love Your Soil

Do you think about soil much, or is it just something you walk around on, or maybe try to grow something in?

Dark, rich, healthy looking soil
Dark, rich, healthy looking soil

If you’re a farmer or gardener (as we know many of you are), you’re probably already aware of how important the soil is, and (like Hugh) may even revel in the smell, look and feel of beautiful soil.

Hugh sprung smelling rainforest soil
Hugh sprung smelling rainforest soil

But soil is so much more than most of us realise – for example, did you know that one-quarter of the world’s biodiversity lives in the soil!

How incredible is that?

Rather than being an inert, dead thing, it’s actually a thriving community of more microbes, worms, arthropods and other insects than we can even imagine, let alone count.

That is, if you’re looking after it properly!

Treating your soil badly by using chemicals, allowing compaction to develop, letting it get waterlogged or too dry, or consistently removing organic matter without replacing it can all create conditions that don’t help your fruit trees and other plants to thrive, and in fact encourage diseases to get established.

Filling new beds with soil at our farm shop to create a native garden
Filling new beds with soil at our farm shop to create a native garden

So, what to do? Well it’s pretty simple. We love busting the myth that “it takes 100 years to make 1 cm of soil”, because in fact if you do the right things, you can build healthy soil much faster than that.

The keys are:

  1. Consistently add organic matter to your soil (i.e., anything that used to be alive: compost, manure, mulch and worm castings are the most common)
  2. Add microbes to your soil, and then feed them regularly. Compost, compost tea, or worm juice are easy ways to add microbes, and they love to eat organic matter, liquid fish, and liquid seaweed.
  3. Have live groundcover plants under your fruit trees.

It’s also important to make sure there’s enough water (but not too much), and that the soil gets enough oxygen.

If you’re not sure whether your soil is healthy, we wrote a course just for you!

Fat juicy worms with lots of food in our worm farm
Fat juicy worms with lots of food in our worm farm

There are LOTS of techniques available to help you take these key actions in your garden. One of the most useful (though least understood) is by having a worm farm, which is much easier than most people realise!

Fruit tree leaves: bonus or problem?

Here’s a question we were asked recently: as the leaves fall off your fruit trees, is it OK to let the leaves rot on the ground, or are you potentially creating a disease problem?

Autumn apricot leaves on the ground
Autumn apricot leaves on the ground

Issues like this are often decided by comparing the costs (in time, money or effort) of taking action, against the benefit.

Plus, you’ve got to consider what you’d do with the leaves if you collected them, and factor this into the equation. If they can go into an active compost system, or be fed to animals, and therefore returned to the soil, this is a very different outcome to filling up your greenwaste bin, or – horror of horrors – putting them in landfill!

In this case we’re weighing up the benefit of the lovely organic matter and nutrient provided by the leaves returning to the soil, versus the potential risk of fungal disease from any spores that are on the leaves, which may create disease in the tree next season, like Blossom blight, for example.

Blossom blight on apricot flowers
Blossom blight on apricot flowers

So, how to decide?

The rule of thumb is that it’s beneficial to let the leaves rot under the trees as long as they break down quickly (within a couple of months, and certainly before next spring).

Fruit tree leaves starting to break down
Fruit tree leaves starting to break down

If you have reasonably healthy soil with an active soil food web and plenty of worms, there should be no problem and the leaves will break down quickly. The soil food web and the key role it plays in the health of your garden is explained in detail in this short course.

If you find they’re not breaking down fast enough you can help them along by mowing them with the mower or slasher, and either sprinkle a bit of compost on top, or spray them with compost tea or worm juice to help them along.