Time to Bud…

It comes around so quick. Amidst the busy-ness of summer harvest time we somehow find time to kneel among our beautiful seedling root stock nursery and imagine the varieties they will one day be. It’s a little bit Frankenstein, a little bit God, to change the destiny of these wee trees and transform them into the varieties of juicy, tasty fruit we want them to be. But that’s how it works. If we let the trees that we’ve grown from seed or cutting grow to maturity, sure they will fruit, but the fruit will likely be small, not very tasty or both! In the case of citrus and plum seedlings, they will most likely be extremely spiky too! 

That’s where summer budding comes in. By budding we can add one or more know varieties of fruit cultivar to the seedling rootstock. That’s where the Frankenstein thing comes in. You have to have a surgeon’s precision (and ideally over 50 year’s experience like Merv) to cut the fine incisions in the bark of the rootstock trunk (which by now is about the thickness of your index finger), just big enough for the bud to slide in and get taped on. Once the sap starts to flow and join the new bud onto the original rootstock tree then we have success, but if our cuts are a bit outta whack, the bud a bit big or dry, or the season too late then we have to wait again until spring to graft and try again.

February is the ideal time for budding. The rootstock trees are as big as they’re going to get (more or less) and the sap is still flowing, so happy unions between bud and tree can happen. Once the trees start to slow down for autumn and their winter hibernation, then the bark wont ‘lift’ anymore to receive a bud. This week, we (Merv, Katie and Sas) started our summer budding on the peaches. With freshly sharpened knives in hand we budded about 150 trees of all sorts of varieties of peach and nectarine. The rootstock trees we’ve grown from seed we saved out of last year’s bottling adventures. If the buds are successful, the trees should be ready to plant out in winter 2020.

It’s not the most glamorous or elegant activity, spending hours on your elbows and knees carefully slicing open small trees. But it is so incredibly interesting to see how the trees grow and learn about all the different varieties and experiment with different techniques, such as multi-buds on single trees. If we’re creating monsters, at least they’re edible monsters!!!

Grow well

Sas

Feeding people in a changing climate

Today the temperature is set to top 43° with winds up to 50 km/hr. Not an unusual summers day in these parts, but with climate change realities becoming more and more pronounced we can expect days like these to get more and more frequent. Feeding people in a changing climate is a huge challenge and one we as farmers are faced with every day. So today, in preparation for the heat and winds, we tuck all our delicate crops in under shade cloth, water early early to get the moisture down into the soil, mulch what we can and watch for the cool change.

This time of year is slightly nerve wracking. We start our 5-6 month veggie box season in 2 weeks, and many of our crops are only just starting to fruit. A few days like today can completely wipe out whole rows of things and set us back months. Our box customers pay upfront for their boxes, so we are committed to delivering boxes in 2 weeks’ time, but nature doesn’t always keep to our timelines!

This morning I picked the first of our zucchinis and cucumbers and looked at the baby eggplants and tomatoes slowly expanding on their plants.  So far so good.

 

Last year we provided 40 mixed vegetable boxes to our community for 5 months. This year we are hoping to provide 50 boxes for 6 months. If you’re interested in getting a box, there are still some available. We have a small weekly box for $30/wk (suitable for 1-3 people) and a large box for $50/wk (suitable for 3-5 people. There is the optional extra of $10 worth of gorgeous organic fruit from Tellurian Fruit Gardens too.

We ask our box customers to commit to 3 months at a time, which makes the admin and planning so much easier for us, but if that kind of upfront payment isn’t possible for you we are always happy to work something out. Pick ups are from The Farm shop on Wednesdays 10 am- 1 pm and Fridays 10 am – 1 pm and we are also doing a Castlemaine drop off at the Theater Royal courtyard on Wednesdays 5-6 pm. Boxes start on 17 Jan (fingers crossed!)

To order a veggie box, go to our Open Food Network shop:

https://openfoodnetwork.org.au/gunghoegrowers/shop

Thanks to everyone who has supported us throughout 2018, we’re looking forward to another year of growing real food for our people.

Happy New Year to you all, may your 2019 be full of peaceful and joyful abundance!

Sas (and Mel)

Gung Hoe Growers

We know it’s winter when…

We know it’s winter when…we stop rushing to harvest the salad as early as possible before the sun makes the delicate leaves wilt and instead we switch to harvesting it when our hands have warmed up enough to have the dexterity to pick it! We know it’s winter when we pack away all our veggie shade netting and pull out the frost cloth to protect our delicate green leaves from freezing. We know it’s a dry winter when the skin on our hands is as cracked and dry as the soil itself and when we are still watering the vegetables in July (we would normally stop in April)! And we know it’s winter when we can take a holiday.

Things never stop needing to be done on the farm, we harvest and sell vegetables every week of the year, but one of the beauties of being in a business partnership is that you can step away every now and then and know that everything will keep on ticking and being cared for while you’re away.

This time last year we were just starting to prepare the ‘new patch’ with a run over by Dave Griffiths and his Yeoman’s plough. We grew our first crops on that fresh ground in summer and are now almost finished getting everything for winter and spring in the ground. The first caulis and brocs are ready for harvest and we may actually even get some brussel sprouts this year!

This winter we’re putting in our first rhubarb and asparagus crowns, cape gooseberries, and globe artichokes, which is very exciting. The thought of permanent rows of perennial edibles warms my heart. We’re also starting to put in some edible wind and roo breaks to protect our patch—pomegranates, citrus, elder flowers, and maybe even an avocado or two.

With the help of our lovely vollies we have also planted loads of spring flowering bulbs like daffodils, jonquils, irises, freesias and ranunculus. Just coz they’re beautiful and just coz by the time spring comes we’re all really hanging out for those bursts of colour to remind us the soil is warming up!

Grow well

Sas