Tree sales are go!

The season is turning and our beautiful fruit trees are starting to lose their leaves and go dormant for the winter. Katie and Merv have been out amongst them, counting up how many trees of what variety are a good size to sell and loading the information onto the website ready for sale.

We’ve got loads of different varieties of nectarine, peach, cherry, apple, pear, plum and apricots available.

We even have the first of our unique multigrafted trees with up to 4 varieties of fruit on the one tree!! Perfect for people with limited space for growing who want to get the maximum amount of variety in their home-grown-fruit bowl!

If you want to order one of our organic bare-rooted fruit trees, go to the website here:

https://www.mafg.com.au/trees

…and scroll to the bottom of the page to click on the type of fruit tree you’re looking for.

Orders close June 30, 2019.

We are the only certified organic fruit trees nursery in Australia (that we know of) and since it is also our first year selling our trees, we will also supplement the trees we’ve grown ourselves with wholesale trees from another nursery who also specialise in heritage varieties. When you’re ordering, the trees from our nursery have “(organic)” in the name; the trees we buy from an external nursery do not.

You’ll then be able to pick-up your trees from the farm on the weekend of July 13 and 14, between 10 am and 4 pm.

We will also have a Nursery Open Day on Sunday 21 July for a final sale of any trees that weren’t sold in the first round. 

Another big announcement is that we finally have a logo for Carr’s Organic Fruit Tree Nursery!! After much deliberation, debate and fine tweaking over co-op morning tea, we decided to go with this logo that has a hand-drawn image of Merv’s grafting knife at the top of it.

We debated whether anyone would know what a grafting knife is, and whether we should just go with some sort of generic image of a tree, like a million other businesses have. In the end we decided that the knife (even if no one knows what it is) really says more about the nursery and its history. Merv has had this knife for 65 years, since he first started studying horticulture at Burnley College as a 17 year old.

The knife has had so much use over the years that the blade has worn down to almost a sliver, but it still gets pulled out and sharpened for budding every February. It represents the knowledge of an old skill that is being passed down from Merv to Katie and me.

The clincher too is that inscribed on the butt of the blade, and still visible, are the words ‘Oil the Joints’. Poignant.

Should you spray organic fungicide in autumn?

A peach bud in spring with copper spray
A peach bud in spring with copper spray

A lot of people don’t think “organic” and “spray” go together, but actually there’s a couple of relatively ‘safe’ sprays that certified organic growers can use, under strict organic standards.

The only sprays we use are organic fungicides — a little bit of copper, and elemental sulphur — because in a wet season they can make a huge difference in preventing some particularly nasty fungal diseases if you use them in spring.

An apricot with brown rot
An apricot with brown rot

Some people also recommend spraying fungicides on fruit trees after the crop has been picked in autumn, to clean up any residual disease, but this is a bit more controversial.

So, when is the right time to spray? Do your fruit trees really need an autumn fungicide?

The answer is … sometimes!

In our short course Keep Your Fruit Trees Free From Disease we detail those diseases that can benefit from an autumn spray of an organic fungicide, under certain conditions, like brown rot.

So we certainly don’t rule it out, and it can be a useful part of an overall strategy for cleaning up some diseases. However, in most reasonably healthy trees, you don’t need to routinely use a fungicide.

And that’s a good thing, because even organically allowable sprays can have an impact on the environment, particularly the soil, and you should only ever use the minimum amount necessary, and strive instead for a really rich biodiverse garden where natural immunity will be at its highest. (And you should never use chemical fungicides.)

If you’ve had a dry season – as we have in central Victoria this year – there’s been very little fungal disease.

Remove this diseased wood when pruning for good disease control
Remove this diseased wood when pruning, for good disease control

Under these conditions our strategy includes pruning any diseased wood out of the tree, and totally removing it from the tree and the orchard floor, but we won’t be needing to put on a spray at all. Excellent!

Soil prep before tree planting

It’s time to do some soil preparation before you plant your fruit trees.

Lush green manure crop
Lush green manure crop

It’s a great idea, if you have time, to plant an autumn green manure crop. This is particularly important if:

  1. you have poor soil
  2. you don’t have enough topsoil
  3. you’re planting a tree into an area where a tree has died or you’re aware there has been disease, or
  4. you’re keen to give your new trees the best possible start in life.
Clover is a great addition to a green manure mix
Clover is a great addition to a green manure mix

Here’s how to do it. You can either buy a green manure mix, or make your own—you can find both autumn and spring plant lists in our short course Build Soil Fertility with Green Manures.

We buy the seeds separately and mix them together in a bucket before sowing. You can also add some fine sand into the mix to help spread it evenly.

Mix the seed well before sowing
Mix the seed well before sowing

It’s a good idea to lightly work the soil up (by machine or digging with a shovel) before you spread the seed, then rake lightly to cover the seed with a fine layer of soil.

The idea is that you wait until the ‘autumn break’ before you plant, i.e., after the first decent rainfall event that signals the end of the summer dry. Depending on your area and climate, hopefully this has already happened and you’ll get enough natural rainfall for the crop to grow. 

If you live in a particularly dry area or are currently experiencing drought, it’s still worth trying to get a green manure crop started, but it’s only really practical to do this on a small area, because you’ll have to irrigate the crop to get any benefit.

Select your tree sites first, and then work the soil and plant the green manure crop in an area at least 1 square metre at each tree site.

Once the crop has grown (ideally to at least a few inches tall), turn it back into the soil. It’s good to do this a few weeks before you plant your fruit trees, to give the green matter a chance to break down in the soil.

It’s a pretty straighforward practice, but the benefits to the soil are enormous. If you use the right mix of seed you should be adding a wonderful nutritional boost, as well as some bulk material to increase the organic content of your soil and provide lots of lovely food for the soil microbes.