This is what “retirement” looks like…

We’ve been asked a lot recently how we’re enjoying our retirement. Well, so far, this is what retirement looks like…

Katie and Hugh with filthy dirty faces from putting out compost on a windy day

Though we’re not responsible for most of the orchards any more, we still look after the heritage apple orchard. We didn’t include it in Ant’s lease because the block’s not in production yet—in fact, we’re still planting it.

We started planting the block in 2016 and put in more in 2017, but were so busy looking after the fruit in the other orchards that these poor babies didn’t get the care and attention they deserved.

Then the hares and kangaroos gave them a hard time, so they’ve had a bad start.

This spring, we’ve been able to dote on them. They’ve been whipper-snipped, pruned, the grafts have been cleaned up, the block’s been mowed, and we’ve mulched them with compost.

So it probably doesn’t count as retirement, but it’s VERY satisfying. To our delight (and surprise), most of the trees are happily alive, despite being almost literally buried under grass and weeds.

We’ve also been busily chainsawing the trees that were burned in the bushfire that came through the plum orchard in January. We were aiming to have them all removed by now, but with a few hundred to deal with it’s taken a bit longer than we thought! Clearing fence lines to replace burnt fences is also on the agenda…soon.

Another of our “retirement” activities has been helping Ant out a bit, particularly with those jobs that take more than one set of hands, like netting.

Ant is understandably keen to protect his cherries from potential pests like birds and earwigs, and has been absolutely diligent in following our advice.  He has access to the nets and the net-putter-outerer as part of his lease, but this is the first year since we replanted that there’s really been a crop of cherries worth protecting, so he’s put many hours into modifying and improving the system to make it more effective—and the result looks great.

So it might look like we’re still working, but actually that suits us perfectly. Our intention in setting up the Harcourt Organic Farming Co-op was never to retire, because we’ve never stopped enjoying the physical side of being farmers.

Now, we get the best of both worlds. There’s plenty of hard work available when we want it, without the demands of another fruit season.

The truth is, we’re writing this from the beach. Leaving the farm for more than a day or two between September and April has been pretty much off limits for us for the last 20 years, so being able to take a week off at this time of year is absolutely golden.

The beauty of it is that (despite appearances) we’re still working! When we’re not actually on the beach we’re focusing on our other passion, which is our Grow Great Fruit coaching business. We’ve purposely set it up to be portable and use technology to connect with our members where ever we are (as long as we have wifi).

We’re currently working on a whole new way of helping people to get the fruit-growing skills they need in affordable bite-size chunks, as well as some new free resources (in addition to our  webinar and Weekly Fruit Tips newsletter).

We’re absolutely committed to providing free resources—because we support the human right to an affordable, organic diet—by teaching people the skills to grow their own. We know the joy of eating incredible, free fruit straight from your own tree—we want everyone else to have the same experience. Our free work is supported by our Grow Great Fruit membership program, for those who want to take their fruit growing to the next level.

So thanks for asking—we’re enjoying our non-retirement very much!

RetroSuburbia…and a new future

I had the privilege last night of MC’ing an event and panel discussion  at an event in Castlemaine where David Holmgren introduced his new book “Retrosuburbia: the downshifters guide to a resilient future″. (If you want to know more about it you can check out the website or the Facebook page).

David Holmgren giving his very entertaining “Aussie Street” presentation at the Retrosuburbia event in Castlemaine

David is best known as one of the co-originators of the permaculture concept in the 1970s, along with Bill Mollison. Since then he’s written a number of books, developed three properties and taught permaculture around the world.

RetroSuburbia is a manual for how to use permaculture thinking to create home-based solutions for a sustainable future by applying the idea of retrofitting our homes, gardens, and behaviours. David and his partner Su’s property “Melliodora” is an inspirational example of how living a sustainable lifestyle can really work as a realistic and attractive alternative to what David calls “dependent consumerism” (if you’ve never been there, I can recommend going on one of their tours).

A big part of David’s vision for a resilient and sustainable future is seeing household food growing become part of everyday life, and so we were rapt to find that our range of ebooks have been included in the book as one of the ways people can improve their fruit-growing skills (the books are included for free as part of our Grow Great Fruit program).

Wanting to spend more time teaching is one of the main reasons we’re not running the orchard any more. Ever since we started the Grow Great Fruit business in 2013, it’s been squeezed into the cracks in our farming life—and to be honest, there haven’t been many!

While we purposely chose to set up GGF as an online business so that we could reach as many people as possible, over the years we’ve found the part that we find most satisfying is the contact with people—but we haven’t had time to do much of it.

Ant and Mel represented HOFC (the Harcourt Organic Farming Co-op) at the networking event before the Retrosuburbia launch

So, now that Ant has taken over the orchard (and rebranded it Tellurian Fruit Gardens), we’re very much looking forward to getting stuck into our mission of teaching as many people as possible how to be self-sufficient with their fruit growing.

We’ve got lots of ideas about how to reach more people, make the program more accessible, and increase its effectiveness. We’re not sure yet exactly what will change (yes, Hugh, we do have to do another strategic planning session…), but some of the ideas we’ve been playing with include:

  • Going global—we’ve developed a northern hemisphere version of the program and briefly tested the US market, but had to pull back due to lack of time to commit to the project;
  • Expanding and improving services for members with more masterclasses, case studies, videos and a vastly expanded Fruit Tree Database;
  • Running workshops in different places such as members’ properties or community gardens;
  • Turning our workshops into an interactive online format to make them accessible to people who can’t physically get to a workshop.

One of the things we’re really interested in is working with people and groups that will get the most benefit out of increased food security. While we love working with our current members in Australia, we’re aware that most of them—like us—already enjoy pretty good food security and economic prosperity, particularly when looked at in a global context.

We feel like it’s time to use our position of privilege to help create food security for people to whom it can make a genuine difference, so we’ll also be looking at things like:

  • Scholarships for low-income people;
  • Working with small-scale or start-up farmers in Australia or overseas to help them increase profitability and sustainability within their fruit growing businesses;
  • Working with community groups.

So we’re looking at an as-yet-unknown but exciting future, and can’t wait to get started on the next stage of our journey as organic fruit growers. There’s just that strategic planning session to organise first!

It doesn’t cost anything to give it a go!

Buds are starting to swell and seeds are beginning to germinate…a call to action in the heritage fruit tree nursery. Merv has been busy preparing the soil in the new nursery patch. Katie has been busy selling the last of the beautiful fruit trees that we grew before they come out of their winter sleep and need to be planted in the ground properly again. But now that our saved apple, quince, pear and peach seeds are starting to shoot, its all hands on deck.

This week we planted our cherry rootstock and acquired some compact apple rootstock varieties to experiment with. Along with grafting the cherries in September and budding the apples we’re hoping to experiment with creating a ‘stool bed’. Katie and I haven’t ever done a stool bed so we’re excited to learn this technique from Merv. A stool bed (from my limited understanding) is a way of trench layering a ‘mother plant’ in order to grow multiple root stock trees from a small number of ‘mothers’. This is important for cherry rootstock, which don’t grow readily from seed, and special varieties of rootstock, which you want to multiply true to type.


The plum cuttings are starting to ‘heel up’ (grow a heel/scab over them from which the roots will sprout) which means we’ll plant them out soon . The apple, peach and quince seeds are sprouting so we’ve begun to plant them out in rows. These we will grow up over summer and ‘bud’ in February with a number of different varieties for sale the following year.

We have also been cutting back the trees we budded last February, to the bud union. These trees (see pic) with different colored pipe cleaners are the plum rootstock we budded multiple varieties of plum and apricot onto. Another experiment, which so far seems to be going well…as long as we can keep track of which branch has which variety budded onto it!!

Soon it will be time to sow our green manure crop in the resting nursery patches and sow some more citrus seed in the hot house (yet another experiment). Most of the rootstock we grow, except for our experiments with cherries, citrus and small apple rootstock, we have grown ourselves. We either collect seed or take cuttings to create them, and like Merv always marvels, “it doesn’t cost you anything”! There is a lot of time and care that then goes into turning that seedling into a good fruiting tree, but Merv’s right, it doesn’t cost you anything to give it a go!