We’re saying Yes!

This week in the patch we are saying YES! Yes to a diverse crop of rainbow cherry tomatoes freshly planted and trellised in our new patch. Yes to redirecting the kangaroo traffic around (rather than over) our newly planted seedlings. Yes to slow soaking rain that makes everything stand up in all its green glory. Yes to the madness of the spring summer season that is soaring ahead…and Yes to pulling out our third crop of garlic.

Lately the world out there has been getting crazy. The politics of our nation seem to be receding into a black hole of discrimination, game playing and crimes against humanity… sometimes you’ve just got to focus on the small wins you can make with your own hands, and be grateful. Yes.

Thanks to our lovely cheese-making friend Lydia for helping us out on a stinking hot day to plant hundreds of tomato seedlings. Thank you to Meg from CERES propagation for growing up all those healthy seedlings. We’ve had a few smashed by passing kangaroos, but hopefully now with our ingenious trellising and fencing (which includes our old undies ripped up and attached to the fence so the roos can see it!), the rest will survive. Thank you to Katie and Hugh for their continued support, creativity and generosity in creating our new farming alliance which gets more exciting by the day.

Next week we pull out our garlic. Stay tuned for our online shop where you can preorder your ½ or whole kg garlic plaits. We’re also madly planting out all our summer crops now that the soil has warmed up and we’ve got the irrigation system happening. But today, with this beautiful rain, it is time to spray our Biodynamic Preparation 500 (cow horn manure) and get the soil life buzzing!

 

Hindsight is a wonderful thing…

Hindsight is a wonderful thing. Well, maybe not in the moment when you look back and realise that if you had done things a little differently, or with a little more forethought, you might have saved yourself a whole lotta work. But there’s always next time, right?

We’re sure there was a really good reason we got Dave with his tractor to form up the long beds in our new patch in winter. We just can’t really remember what the reasons were. Maybe we had more ambitious ideas about actually planting into them in winter, or sowing a green manure crop that we’d dig in in late winter to feed the soil ready for spring and summer crops. All good ideas in theory, but actually what has happened is that all those beautiful long clean rows, carefully prepared in June, have grown a bumper crop of beautiful weeds and now in preparation for our spring plantings we have to deal with them! In hindsight, now would be the perfect time to have our once-off visit from Dave with his machine to form up the new beds, turning the beautiful lush winter weeds into the soil, green manure style at the same time… ready for mulching and planting out in a few weeks for summer.

With our glass-half-full brains on, the weeds that have grown in the new beds are a perfect, diverse green manure crop, just waiting to feed our soil. But 630 square metres of land is a lot to dig by hand! Our new patch is also critically low in nitrogen (amongst other nutrients) and so the last two weeks has seen us shift 10 cubic meters of organic cow poo by wheelbarrow onto the new beds and spend 10 hours straight on a rotary hoe and 10 hours straight on a whipper-snipper to slash, turn, and tuck all those weeds and cow poo back into the soil. This time without the big tractor!

Using a rotary hoe is not our preferred method, as over time and with overuse it can create a compaction layer in the soil. But coupled with our deep broadforking every time we plant a new crop and encouragement of life in the soil, we figure we can get away with it, just this once!

Mel and I are fairly well spent after the last few weeks, but all the babies in the hot-house are coming along nicely and will need planting out soon. So, clearing out the last of our spring crops, feeding and mulching the beds ready to receive them is the focus of the next few weeks. The patch is gorgeous at the moment, flowers everywhere…even some very early sunflowers that sowed themselves in the paths at the end of last summer and survived the entire winter. Ripe tomatoes can’t be too far off…Love it.

Drip, drip, drip…

Maths isn’t my (Sas’) strong point. Start talking numbers to me and very quickly my eyes glaze over as my mind wanders to a ‘happy place’. This week however Mel and I had to force our brains through some serious mental rigours in order to nut out a plan for our irrigation system in the new patch. With the expert (and patient) guidance of Bill, the regional rep for Toro (an irrigation manufacturer) and lots of head scratching and number crunching, we have (hopefully) gotten to the bottom of some of our existing irrigation woes and worked out a more precise and efficient set up for the new beds.

There’s lots to take into account, like the pressure in the main lines, the flow rate of the water, what else is being watered on the property when we are also watering, how many lineal meters of drip line and how many litres per hour per meter they put out, which all determines how we work out the best set up….are your eyes glazed over yet?

Our next big step for spring (now that we’ve relocated the hot house out to the farm and set up an automatic watering system in it) is to start installing the new irrigation system. When that’s done, we will be able to plant out all our green spring babies from the hot house safely knowing all their thirsty needs will be met.

Last year we had real issues with all our crops not getting consistent and even watering. We had patchy germination on our direct seeded rows and patches of thriving and struggling crops. Now that Bill helped us troubleshoot what the possible issues are, we’re looking forward to a more productive summer. Fingers crossed.

Another element of the new irrigation plan that totally rocks our world is the inclusion of a fertigator. This is a simple device that operates without electricity but using pressure differentiation in the irrigation lines to mix liquid fertilisers into the irrigation lines when needed.  We will no longer have to administer Seasol and compost teas, watering can by watering can to every one of our rows, the fertigator will be able to pump our earthy concoctions through our irrigation lines while we weed! Amazing.

On other news…don’t forget we’ve got our Gung How Growers open day this Sunday 24th September from 10am to 12pm, with a tour scheduled for 11am. There will be cake and tea and scones and jam, seedlings for sale and a chance to pre-order your garlic plaits. No eftpos available so come with cashola. Hope to see you there.

Grow well…

Sas and Mel