Introducing Marty and Cara – our awesome vollies!

Earlier this year we received a somewhat straightforward email from a guy called Sven. I may be showing my ignorance here but my first impression was that his English was very good. We arranged a time that would work for us for him to come out for a few hours; he was true to his word, turned up, helped us cart cow poo down to prep beds and then planted broad beans and peas. Somehow throughout those few hours we figured out his name was Marty, not Sven. He seemed nice enough and I was interested to hear about how he ended up in this part of the world and why he wanted to spend time with us. He turned up the next week, and the next and said his partner Cara was also keen to come give a few hours…the rest is history. These two came along “right when we were both feeling totally exhausted and lifted our spirits.” (Sas quote).

Having these two on the farm has given Sas and me so much laughter, joy and what feels like new energy. At least one of them comes every week (along with Cohen) and its a true transfer of time, knowledge, skills, food (we share lunch and morning tea), smiles, bad jokes and education. We learn lots from them too, true story. They have shown us that people do CARE, want to LEARN, are MOTIVATED and that there is HOPE. Though I think the biggest thing actually is that they have become good friends. We share a lot in common (maybe not hat styles) and love hearing their opinions, experiences and points of view.

I hope that they never underestimate what richness they give us all by being a part of what is happening out here in Harcourt and simply by being their own true selves; no casual feat and something I wholeheartedly admire.

Marty asked us if they could do our next blog entry, so of course we said yes please!! So here it is. I may have shed a tear or two…

Grow well, Mel (and Sas) xx

Marty:
The ute drives down the driveway, dust and gravel flying up in the rear view mirror. Morning is beautiful in this part of the country. The sun slowly shines through the gums and wattles, lifting the frost and leaving a gentle mist. You may be asking, who are you? And why should we care? My name’s Marty. I moved from Footscray at the end of last year to live in a van and learn to live more connected to nature and people. My partner and I got rid of nearly everything we own and jammed whatever we had left into our ute, waving goodbye to city life. This has been a year of learning and transition for both of us.

We spent a few months in Metcalfe helping out at a Market Garden. Once that fizzled out, I offered to start helping out Gung Hoe Growers as part of a non-monetary exchange for food. I have an arrangement where I help for a few hours a week and they give me a generous box of veggies. My intention was to learn about what these lovely people are all about. It would be somewhat strange to explain just how much I love them all.

So I will just focus on how this whole experience has affected my life. I have received knowledge about growing food, understanding the land, responding to the environment. I have made new friendships with genuinely like minded people. I have a rejuvenated hope for the future of a world dealing with climate change. I have found a meaningful grass-roots revolt against oppressive food systems that are ruining the planet and people. I have found a network of creative musicians, beatniks, poets, artists and friggen’ legends. This farm is so much more than just a way for me to spend my Tuesday mornings, it has made me feel at home.

Cara:
Bumping down the driveway in the ute after a full morning working with the Gung Hoe gals, soil compacted under my fingernails and a sense of muscles I didn’t know existed, I feel elated! The sleepy cobwebs of the early start have cleared and I’m humbled by the generous, warm and tough as nails spirit of everyone at the farm.

Hauling wheelbarrows of soil and hay to prep new veggie beds, I laugh at my ridiculous incapability as Sas basically single-handedly carries weight that I cripple under! Wrestling with dock and mallow, I smile at Mel’s genuine excitement at spotting worms as we disturb the soil! Scally visits with sticks, coyly begging that we play her game. As the sun lifts up over the mountains, we squat in amongst a row of over-run brassicas, carefully picking out weeds, feeling the plants sigh with relief at their new-found growing room, the delicious smell of damp soil and foliage. We move down the row clearing the weeds like a conveyor belt, five of us working like a single body, 10 hands sharing the load, squatting, shifting down, squatting, buzzing with talk of music, art, food… I meditate on our connection to the ground, to our food, to each other. Being out at the farm is nourishing in more ways than I can describe.

In the ute on the way home, Marty and I banter on excitedly about what the co-op are doing and how good we feel being there! I’ve discovered this year that growing food is an epic feat! It’s not a job you half-heartedly walk in and out of, and take leave when you please. Working alongside the co-op has highlighted for me that there needs to be a shared investment in local food. My pessimistic view that our current food system is not sustainable is countered by an optimistic belief in the action and commitment of the folks at Harcourt.

Gung Hoe Growers

69 Danns Rd Harcourt

It doesn’t cost anything to give it a go!

Buds are starting to swell and seeds are beginning to germinate…a call to action in the heritage fruit tree nursery. Merv has been busy preparing the soil in the new nursery patch. Katie has been busy selling the last of the beautiful fruit trees that we grew before they come out of their winter sleep and need to be planted in the ground properly again. But now that our saved apple, quince, pear and peach seeds are starting to shoot, its all hands on deck.

This week we planted our cherry rootstock and acquired some compact apple rootstock varieties to experiment with. Along with grafting the cherries in September and budding the apples we’re hoping to experiment with creating a ‘stool bed’. Katie and I haven’t ever done a stool bed so we’re excited to learn this technique from Merv. A stool bed (from my limited understanding) is a way of trench layering a ‘mother plant’ in order to grow multiple root stock trees from a small number of ‘mothers’. This is important for cherry rootstock, which don’t grow readily from seed, and special varieties of rootstock, which you want to multiply true to type.


The plum cuttings are starting to ‘heel up’ (grow a heel/scab over them from which the roots will sprout) which means we’ll plant them out soon . The apple, peach and quince seeds are sprouting so we’ve begun to plant them out in rows. These we will grow up over summer and ‘bud’ in February with a number of different varieties for sale the following year.

We have also been cutting back the trees we budded last February, to the bud union. These trees (see pic) with different colored pipe cleaners are the plum rootstock we budded multiple varieties of plum and apricot onto. Another experiment, which so far seems to be going well…as long as we can keep track of which branch has which variety budded onto it!!

Soon it will be time to sow our green manure crop in the resting nursery patches and sow some more citrus seed in the hot house (yet another experiment). Most of the rootstock we grow, except for our experiments with cherries, citrus and small apple rootstock, we have grown ourselves. We either collect seed or take cuttings to create them, and like Merv always marvels, “it doesn’t cost you anything”! There is a lot of time and care that then goes into turning that seedling into a good fruiting tree, but Merv’s right, it doesn’t cost you anything to give it a go!

What a handy machine…

As Sas and I sat in the brief moment of sunshine yesterday eating our lunch we made some decisions about tomatoes. It will only be a few more weeks of being quite laid back and not feeling nervous about the next 8 months to come.  I am grateful for the winter even though I get cold, I can take a break in my mind somewhat and bunker down and rest. After recuperating from rest my nature then feels restless and wants to run away on adventures…so committing (again) to small(er) adventures than going away for a few months on a walking trip through the Victorian alps and snowy mountain country – feels frustrating, but I hope to be at peace with it in a few weeks!
Sas and I have been reflecting this month about the fact that this year is the first we haven’t expanded.  Ever.  Each year until now we have doubled our production size every year. This means that each year whatever profit we have made goes directly into financing the next upsize. More watering infrastructure, more seedlings, bigger greenhouse, more seed trays, another fence, more shade/frost cloth, more soil inputs, more mulch, more poo, more time, more tools, more containers to wash/store/sell produce in.
This time last year we were digging up and preparing 1/4 acre ready for summer production. We are glad that this winter we haven’t done that and can see the benefit of better timing re: planting, head space, accounting time, succession numbers/rotations and planting and, yes, some moments to breathe.
We are aware however, of our need to invest and upskill. We are trying (trying!!) to become more efficient at what we do. After a year of thinking about it, we are pretty sure we are going to invest in a Pasquali 2-wheel walk-behind tractor. It will increase the amount we can do in the same amount of time. It will not compact the soil, but rather help us to incorporate organic matter (such as green manures, compost, rock dust) easier and quicker – thus helping rotations and soil health – which means more nutrient-rich food. Hurray!!
This will put us back almost $15,000…not a small sum. Well, for us it’s not! We are being cautious with this investment (and loan) but are pretty certain it will help us to be more financially viable, save our backs some and time too, and pay itself back via efficiency, thus better management and more production on the other end.
We have been speaking with Darren from Vin Rowe in Warragul and he is going to come up to Harcourt with a machine and all its different implements on Tuesday 21 August. If you or anyone you know is interested to join the demonstration and practical info session we would love you to join us. We have a few people already joining us and we say the more the merrier; we might even meet a few new peeps!! Please email gunghoegrowers@gmail.com to let us know you’re interested, and then when we know the exact time Darren will be up on the Tuesday, we can let you know. If you’re intrigued and have no idea what we’re on about you can see better here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gl_cOxfXzD4
Otherwise, I hope you are well and staying warm and healthy in mind, body and spirit and that the planets and this blood moon isn’t causing too much upheaval!!
Grow well and get in touch if you’re keen to check out a helpful machine and its bits!
Mel (and Sas)