RetroSuburbia…and a new future

I had the privilege last night of MC’ing an event and panel discussion  at an event in Castlemaine where David Holmgren introduced his new book “Retrosuburbia: the downshifters guide to a resilient future″. (If you want to know more about it you can check out the website or the Facebook page).

David Holmgren giving his very entertaining “Aussie Street” presentation at the Retrosuburbia event in Castlemaine

David is best known as one of the co-originators of the permaculture concept in the 1970s, along with Bill Mollison. Since then he’s written a number of books, developed three properties and taught permaculture around the world.

RetroSuburbia is a manual for how to use permaculture thinking to create home-based solutions for a sustainable future by applying the idea of retrofitting our homes, gardens, and behaviours. David and his partner Su’s property “Melliodora” is an inspirational example of how living a sustainable lifestyle can really work as a realistic and attractive alternative to what David calls “dependent consumerism” (if you’ve never been there, I can recommend going on one of their tours).

A big part of David’s vision for a resilient and sustainable future is seeing household food growing become part of everyday life, and so we were rapt to find that our range of ebooks have been included in the book as one of the ways people can improve their fruit-growing skills (the books are included for free as part of our Grow Great Fruit program).

Wanting to spend more time teaching is one of the main reasons we’re not running the orchard any more. Ever since we started the Grow Great Fruit business in 2013, it’s been squeezed into the cracks in our farming life—and to be honest, there haven’t been many!

While we purposely chose to set up GGF as an online business so that we could reach as many people as possible, over the years we’ve found the part that we find most satisfying is the contact with people—but we haven’t had time to do much of it.

Ant and Mel represented HOFC (the Harcourt Organic Farming Co-op) at the networking event before the Retrosuburbia launch

So, now that Ant has taken over the orchard (and rebranded it Tellurian Fruit Gardens), we’re very much looking forward to getting stuck into our mission of teaching as many people as possible how to be self-sufficient with their fruit growing.

We’ve got lots of ideas about how to reach more people, make the program more accessible, and increase its effectiveness. We’re not sure yet exactly what will change (yes, Hugh, we do have to do another strategic planning session…), but some of the ideas we’ve been playing with include:

  • Going global—we’ve developed a northern hemisphere version of the program and briefly tested the US market, but had to pull back due to lack of time to commit to the project;
  • Expanding and improving services for members with more masterclasses, case studies, videos and a vastly expanded Fruit Tree Database;
  • Running workshops in different places such as members’ properties or community gardens;
  • Turning our workshops into an interactive online format to make them accessible to people who can’t physically get to a workshop.

One of the things we’re really interested in is working with people and groups that will get the most benefit out of increased food security. While we love working with our current members in Australia, we’re aware that most of them—like us—already enjoy pretty good food security and economic prosperity, particularly when looked at in a global context.

We feel like it’s time to use our position of privilege to help create food security for people to whom it can make a genuine difference, so we’ll also be looking at things like:

  • Scholarships for low-income people;
  • Working with small-scale or start-up farmers in Australia or overseas to help them increase profitability and sustainability within their fruit growing businesses;
  • Working with community groups.

So we’re looking at an as-yet-unknown but exciting future, and can’t wait to get started on the next stage of our journey as organic fruit growers. There’s just that strategic planning session to organise first!

The important work of becoming a fruit tree parent

Proud parents picking up new fruit trees

It’s tree pick-up week, and as people have been coming to the farm to collect their fruit trees the days have been full of conversations about their plans for their gardens and orchards, explaining different tree training systems and giving mini-pruning lessons, explaining the merits of different fruit varieties, and providing impromptu planting demos.

When they feel ready and armed with all the right info, we help them load up their trees and wave them off as they go home to get planting. It’s a little like sending new parents home with their babies, and as I imagine midwives must feel when they say goodbye to a young family, I’m simultaneously delighted to see them start their journey together, and slightly nervous about how they’ll manage, particularly if they’re first-time parents.

Trees waiting to be picked up and taken to their new homes

Of course, trees and babies are completely different cases, because babies are the most precious thing in the world and must be kept alive at all cost, but it doesn’t really matter if a tree dies from neglect or mistreatment, it’s just a few bucks down the drain and you start again, right?

Strictly speaking that’s true, but actually, there’s a little more at stake. You see, I know something more…I know what it feels like to nurture a fruit tree all the way through to maturity and harvest, and it’s almost indescribably satisfying.

Rhonda bravely pruning her brand new tree for the first time

It starts with planting it out in the right spot in the garden and giving it the first (terrifying) pruning.

Then you’re responsible for protecting it from pests that might damage it and making sure it has healthy soil and enough water.

You nervously watch it grow and then bloom, are awed by the miracle of pollination and seeing fading flowers falling off to reveal tiny fruit.

You protect the fruit from pests and diseases, and then … finally … harvest the most delicious fruit you’ve ever tasted in your life, because you grew it yourself.

Over years the trees grow, your skill grows, and your confidence that you can protect your precious crop against all the hazards and dangers that threaten it will grow too. And it needs to, because this is important work. You’re providing nutritious organic food for your family for the whole year, not just summer. You’re saving money in the family budget. You’re giving your kids irreplaceable memories of picking fruit straight from the tree. You need to get results every year, not just the years you’re “lucky”.

And when it works and you bring in the harvest, you feel on top of the world because you know you’ve joined the ranks of one of the most important groups in society—the food providers, those salt-of-the earth types who have the seemingly magical ability to coax delicious food from a little dirt, sunshine and hard work. You’re a farmer.

I know all this because this has been my journey over the last 20 years.  Yes, as with raising children, there’s pain along the way as you make mistakes and things go wrong, but I know the joy that lies ahead for you, and while admittedly it’s nowhere near as special as bringing a whole new human into the world, I’ve done that too so can say with the voice of experience that your fruit trees are not going to give you nearly as many sleepless nights!

We know it’s winter when…

We know it’s winter when…we stop rushing to harvest the salad as early as possible before the sun makes the delicate leaves wilt and instead we switch to harvesting it when our hands have warmed up enough to have the dexterity to pick it! We know it’s winter when we pack away all our veggie shade netting and pull out the frost cloth to protect our delicate green leaves from freezing. We know it’s a dry winter when the skin on our hands is as cracked and dry as the soil itself and when we are still watering the vegetables in July (we would normally stop in April)! And we know it’s winter when we can take a holiday.

Things never stop needing to be done on the farm, we harvest and sell vegetables every week of the year, but one of the beauties of being in a business partnership is that you can step away every now and then and know that everything will keep on ticking and being cared for while you’re away.

This time last year we were just starting to prepare the ‘new patch’ with a run over by Dave Griffiths and his Yeoman’s plough. We grew our first crops on that fresh ground in summer and are now almost finished getting everything for winter and spring in the ground. The first caulis and brocs are ready for harvest and we may actually even get some brussel sprouts this year!

This winter we’re putting in our first rhubarb and asparagus crowns, cape gooseberries, and globe artichokes, which is very exciting. The thought of permanent rows of perennial edibles warms my heart. We’re also starting to put in some edible wind and roo breaks to protect our patch—pomegranates, citrus, elder flowers, and maybe even an avocado or two.

With the help of our lovely vollies we have also planted loads of spring flowering bulbs like daffodils, jonquils, irises, freesias and ranunculus. Just coz they’re beautiful and just coz by the time spring comes we’re all really hanging out for those bursts of colour to remind us the soil is warming up!

Grow well

Sas